Reaper U: Fire in Snowy Conditions

Reaper U: Fire in Snowy Conditions

Reaper U: K12 Survival Solutions

This edition of Reaper University comes from true survival expert. That man is Rob from K12 Survival Solutions. We feel this arctic weather presents a rather realistic cold weather training opportunity. So get out there, test your gear, and practice your skills. This particular lesson from Rob is how to start a fire in snowy conditions. Enjoy!

Steps to Make Fire in “Snow conditions”

 

1. Put up a shelter.

2. Clear snow to ground.

3. Lay a platform of sticks approx. wrist thickness. You will have the fire on this platform. This gets the fire materials off the wet ground.

4. Gather all your fire materials from the dead branches still on the trees. If it “snaps” its good. Avoid using any wood from the ground. Keep all collected wood off the ground. Place either on a tarp, backpack, or in a tree until ready to use.

5. Use a resinous tree (pine/fir) and collect dead branches from the tree. Break off twigs and pencil size pieces, split a thick piece to expose dry middle heartwood. Hold knife at 90 degrees against wood and shave into pile. Slice strips for tinder. (Reference picture of students shaving stick on orange bag) Make a tinder bundle of these strips with dry fluffy materials. (pine needles, plant fiber, dry leaves, dead grass, pine cattail fluff, shredded cedar bark, birch bark, tulip poplar bark, steel wool, char cloth, dryer lint, cotton balls)

Pine shavings

6. Teepee fire lay-collect twigs and pencil size sticks, hold like a bouquet of flowers and stuff center with tinder. Flip upside down on the ground to form a tinder-stuffed teepee.

7. Lite the tinder bundle inside the teepee with open flame or lite a vaseline cotton ball or commercially available fire enhancer like Wet Fire with an ignition source (ie: spark rod) on your platform underneath the teepee.

Snowcup

 

Index of Terms:

Uses of fire- Heat, signal, light, cooking, sanitizing, tool/weapon, entertainment, smoke bath, bug repellent.

Components of a fire: Ignition source, tinder, kindling, fuel. Fire prep is essential. Have all components ready before you try to start the fire. Build a safe distance from shelter.

Ignition sources: lighters, matches, spark rod, magnesium block, steel wool/battery (cell phone battery), magnifying glass, flashlight lens, flint/steel, bow drill, hand drill.

TINDER: Thin, dry, fluffy, flammable material with low combustion point: tree/ commercial types. Flame/spark enhancers: gun powder, petroleum jelly cotton balls, pine knot, pine resin, potato chips. Make tinder look like a bird nest (tinder bundle). Ignite tinder bundle with a spark or ember, gently blow on it to get flame and place in teepee.

KINDLING: Lots of small, dry twigs up to pencil thick sticks. Take dead branches off of trees-avoid taking from ground. If it snaps, it’s good. Add wood progressively larger to wrist diameter.

FUEL: Wrist diameter and larger. Ignite teepee directly with open flame or use tinder bundle. Reflector wall-stack rocks and/or wood to reflect the heat back to you.

***For tips like this one and more, check out the K12 Pocket Survival Cards and Fire Started Kit at www.k12survivalsolutions.com***

We want to thank Rob for dropping some knowledge on us. Now, its time to go outside and practice this skill. Remember, your skills are perishable. Thanks for reading Reaper Nation! Send us pictures of you practicing your skills, tag us on IG @ReaperOutdoors or Twitter @ReaperOutdoors.

Reaper Team… Out!

 

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Comment (1)

  • harold dale Reply

    I enjoyed your show above the rest. Can not afford $1000.00 for . I connect with you as a down to earth hunting party.hunting jacket and pants, nor the gear. Don,t have a $ 50,000 pick up truck nor a $ 6,000.00 rifle, etc. Most my hunting money is tied up in the rifle and chow. I like the survial part. Thank you for your service to our country. Thumbs up!

    July 19, 2016 at 10:11 pm

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